Is marital surveillance obsolete? Not in big-bucks divorce. Actors Angelina Jolie and Brad Pitt at the 81st Academy Awards. This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported license. Attribution: Chrisa Hickey

Is marital surveillance obsolete? Not in big-bucks divorce

Among the explosion of headlines about the Angelina Jolie / Brad Pitt divorce, some reports are claiming Jolie had hired a private investigator to uncover evidence that her husband was cheating on her with recent co-star Marion Cotillard. The French movie star issued a strong public denial of any affair and took the opportunity to announce that she was pregnant by her long-time partner to boot.

Given the state of personal electronics, one could easily argue that full-scale surveillance is simply not needed. Cell phone records, texts, email, calendars, appointments… cheaters carelessly give up the game easily.

There will always be a need for old-fashioned full-scale stakeouts. In a world where there is no shortage of high-stakes, big-bucks divorce, providing court-admissible proof of infidelity is a job that will never fully become obsolete.

Two senior citizens on a bench, image featured in an article about avoiding senior abuse

Avoid senior citizen abuse: How to check in on a senior no matter where you live

From my chair as a private investigator, we receive calls daily from senior citizens that want to engage our services to help them resolve abusive issues they are going through: physical, sexual, emotional and financial. I’ve found that the matters that involve money are more common than the others combined.

The key to avoiding senior abuse is communication. You want to check in with them. Even if you live far away, or in a distant state. Here’s how.

Hooters girls. This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 Generic license. Flickr author: Stinkie Pinkie.

Teen impersonates police officer to court Hooters girls

Every day, one of our five offices gets a call from a parent who wants us to help them with their troubled teenager that has behavioral issues or problems or with drugs and alcohol. The parents are at their wit’s end and simply don’t know what do to. Fortunately, we do.

I have lectured about this subject, and I’ve written extensively about it. And just when I thought I’d heard it all, up pops 18 year-old Nicholas M. Fuhst with a hair-brained idea for his local Hooters.

Fuhst recently decided to enter a Hooters in Kochville, Michigan and announce he was an “undercover cop.” This is funny to me, because he clearly doesn’t the concept of “undercover”. Having worked as an undercover Drug Enforcement Administration agent for many years, I don’t recall ever announcing to the bad guys that I was working undercover.

Finding veterans addicted to heroin

Finding veterans addicted to heroin

This week we completed a case which involved locating a veteran of the U.S. armed forces that was addicted to heroin. (This is actually the 16th of similar cases like this so far in 2016.) The case was successful – meaning we got the person into detox and then into a rehabilitation program. We have found many more, but the lure of the drugs is too powerful for some to stop. They remain on the street chasing powder.

Chris "Burr" Martin imitates his daughter's selfies on Instagram.

Proactive parents : Kudos to “Selfie Dad”

Many parents retain us to find their lost kids. Many are far from proactive parents. Some engage in drug and alcohol abuse themselves. Often, the entire family needs behavioral modification.

Contrast those parents with Chris Martin of Spokane, Washington. Chris was unhappy that his 19-year-old daughter, Cassie, was posting provocative selfies online.

Chris found a proactive, and interesting way to handle the problem.

OxyContin & opioid addiction

Radio show: Clinton FBI interview, OxyContin & opioid addiction

Last Sunday, I was up before dawn to prepare for a radio show called All Politics Is Local, on WCRN-Radio 830 AM in Boston. The initial purpose of my appearance was to give my opinion about the interview and interrogation process that possibly took place between FBI agents and Hillary Clinton.

Little did I know, I would shortly be speaking about the article to a large New England audience about the OxyContin & opioid addiction problem in America.

Teen military boot camps and work ranches DO NOT WORK

Teen military boot camps and work ranches DO NOT WORK

Recently a New Mexico couple made national headline news this past week by making their 16-year-old son stay in a tent which was pitched in the parent’s backyard as a form of punishment. Opinions were all over the board about this, but trust me: Punishment like this does not work.

Boot camps and work ranches that focus on breaking teens like wild horses only make things worse. You need to get to the core of the behavioral problem, and like anything else in life that is worthwhile: It takes a lot of time and work.